Marthas Vineyard Airport

Noise Abatement

 

Online Complaint Form

At Use this tool to submit a noise complain online with the option of being contacted by a member of our staff.

Please Fly Quiet!

The Martha's Vineyard Airport has created noise abatement procdures for both light and heavy aircraft. The procdures have been incorporated in a easy to understand document which is available from Airport Operations or by cliking here for heavy aircraft (> 12,500 lbs) here for light aircraft(<12,500 lbs) or here for a combination. We ask that all pilots adhere to these procedures in the interest of reducing noise impacts to our community.

Additionally, for jet aircraft we also encourage the use of the NBAA Departure and Approach Procedures to help reduce noise impacts. Below are the procedures from NBAA's noise abatement web site.

NBAA Close-In Departure Procedure (Recommended for Runway 24 Departure)

Climb at maximum practical rate at V2+20 KIAS to 500 feet AFL with takeoff flap setting.

At 500 feet AFL, reduce to a quiet climb power setting while maintaining 1,000 FPM maximum climb rate and V2+20 KIAS until reaching 1,000 feet AFL.

At 1,000 feet AFL, accelerate to final segment speed (Vfs) and retract flaps. Maintain quiet climb power, 1,000 FPM climb rate and airspeed not to exceed 190 KIAS until reaching 3,000 feet AFL. If ATC requires level off prior to reaching 3,000 feet AFL, power must be reduced so as not to exceed 190 KIAS. (See note below)

At 3,000 feet AFL and above, resume normal climb schedule with gradual application of climb power.

Observe all airspeed limitations and ATC instructions.

NOTE: It is recognized that aircraft performance will differ with aircraft type and takeoff conditions; therefore, the business aircraft operator must have the latitude to determine whether takeoff thrust should be reduced prior to, during, or after flap retraction. Also, aircraft in excess of 75,000 lbs. GTOW operating under FAR, Part 121, Part 125, or Part 135 may not be permitted to comply with this procedure.

NBAA Standard Departure Procedure (Recommended for Runway 6 Departure)

Climb at maximum practical rate at V2+20 Knots indicated airspeed (KIAS) to 1,000 feet above field level (AFL) with takeoff flap setting.

At 1,000 feet AFL, accelerate to final segment speed (Vfs) and retract flaps. Reduce to a quiet climb power setting while maintaining 1,000 FPM maximum climb rate and airspeed not to exceed 190 KIAS until reaching 3,000 feet AFL. If ATC requires level off prior to reaching 3,000 feet AFL, power must be reduced so as not to exceed 190 KIAS until at or above 3,000 feet AFL. (See note below)

At 3,000 feet AFL and above, resume normal climb schedule with gradual application of climb power.

Observe all airspeed limitations and ATC instructions.

NOTE: It is recognized that aircraft performance will differ with aircraft type and takeoff conditions; therefore, the business aircraft operator must have the latitude to determine whether takeoff thrust should be reduced prior to, during, or after flap retraction.

NBAA Approach and Landing Procedure VFR & IFR

Inbound flight path should not require more than a 20 degree bank angle to follow noise abatement track.

Observe all airspeed limitations and ATC instructions.

Initial inbound altitude for noise abatement areas will be a descending path from 2,500 feet AGL or higher. Maintain minimum airspeed (1 .3Vs+20 KIAS) with gear retracted and minimum approach flap setting.

At the final approach fix (FAF) or not more than 4 miles from runway threshold, extend landing gear. Final landing flap configuration should be delayed at pilot's discretion to enhance noise abatement.

During landing, use minimum reverse thrust consistent with safety for runway conditions and available length.

 

The Martha's Vineyard Airport is committed to reducing the impact of aircraft noise for our neighbors, guests, and visitors. As such, the airport in conjunction with the FAA and Massachusetts Aeronautics Commission, has conducted noise mitigation studies and developed policies and procedures to this end. We request that all operators employ manufacturers recommendations for noise mitigation and follow the voluntary noise abatement procedures. It should be noted that the airport established a noise curfew policy prohibiting departures exceeding 75 db between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. local time.

AIRCRAFT NOISE

The noise assessment presented in this section is the work product of Edwards & Kelcey, Inc., performed under a separate contract to MVY management. Click here to view the entire text of the noise report.

The noise assessment was completed in two parts: existing or base year (2000) and 2 future years (2005, 2015). By 2015, the proposed shift of Runway 6-24 is presumed to be in place; thus, two scenarios were run for the year 2015, one using the current runway location and another with a 300-foot extension.

Base Year Noise Assessment

Methodology
Integrated Noise Model Version 6.0. The FAA Integrated Noise Model (INM) Version 6.0 was used to generate contours for the base year. 2000 was chosen as the base year for this assessment as it was the last full year of data available. Analyses of area within the day/night equivalent sound level (DNL) 65 decibels (dB) contour and land use by type were performed for the existing condition.

Key noise modeling assumptions relate to fleet mix, runway utilization, the number and orientation of arriving and departing flight tracks, and the distribution of daytime and nighttime operations.

Aircraft Mix. MVY has a unique mix of aircraft. During the summer months, there is a significant level of air carrier activity using a mix or turboprop aircraft such as the Beech 1900 and the ATR 42 to regional jet aircraft including the Canadair CRJ regional jet and the Embraer 145. However, in the off-peak months, the number of commercial aircraft is drastically reduced. General aviation activity is also unique. Due to the airport’s seasonal nature, and its affluent summer community, the airport receives a significant number of private corporate turboprop and jet aircraft. It also sees an increase in smaller single and twin piston aircraft. However, this traffic also falls off during the non-peak months, but there is still a stable group of based GA aircraft that operate at the airport year round.

The 2000 fleet mix for Martha’s Vineyard Airport was developed after discussions with the Air Traffic Control Tower and airport management. The INM’s database of aircraft noise profiles does not represent all aircraft and therefore, some aircraft types were grouped together based upon similarities in aircraft size, engine type, and performance.

Runway Utilization. Runway use includes the number, location, and orientation of the active runways, as well as the directions and types of operations that occur on each runway. Runway use depends primarily on wind direction and speed. It is also a function of factors such as Air Traffic Control procedures and separation standards, terminal location, taxiing distances, and runway length.

Flight Tracks. Flight track information is an important input to the INM, as it represents the path over the ground followed by an aircraft. Because it is not possible to input all of the tracks followed by individual aircraft, the FAA suggests that the tracks be consolidated to represent corridors consisting of estimated average flight tracks. The flight track use was determined with information from the air traffic control tower (ATCT) operators and discussions with airport management. These data are provided in Appendix D-10.

Daytime-Nighttime Operations. The allocation of operations to daytime or nighttime hours is important, as the INM assigns “penalties” to nighttime operations (see discussion of noise metrics below). The proportions of daytime and nighttime activity for the commuter and air taxi operations were determined from the Official Airline Guide and discussions with ATCT and airport management. The proportions of daytime and nighttime activity for general aviation were also determined from discussions with the ATCT and airport management. Based on this information, the day/night split for the airport is 97 percent day and 3 percent night.

It is interesting to note that nighttime operations at MVY occur primarily during the summer months, which represent the bulk of activity for the airport. There is very little nighttime activity that occurs during the winter.

Noise Metrics
The INM was used to generate noise contours in the DNL noise metric, the FAA-required noise metric for airport noise studies. The DNL metric represents average daily noise levels that would occur over a 24-hour period with a 10-decibel penalty added to the noise levels of aircraft operations occurring between the hours of 10:00 PM and 7:00 AM, which is considered nighttime. DNL contours were generated at levels of DNL 60, 65, 70, and 75 dB.

Noise Exposure. To determine if a noise impact exists, the area which is encompassed by the 65 DNL noise contour was analyzed. The 65 DNL contour, as defined by the FAA and the Department of Housing and Urban Development, is the benchmark contour which is normally compatible with residential land use. Less sensitive land uses, such as commercial and industrial, are normally compatible with higher DNL levels of 70 or 75 dB. As depicted in Appendix D-10 Figure 1.05, the entire area within the 65 dB DNL contour lies within the property boundary of MVY. Table 6-3 lists the areas, in square miles, within the 60 and 65 dB DNL contours for the base year operations at the airport. As the table shows, the 65 DNL contour goes off airport property slightly on Runway 24; however, it does not affect any residential homes and therefore, has no significant noise effects.

Noise Monitoring Comparison
Noise monitoring was done for this effort to compare actual noise levels experienced at the airport with noise levels calculated by the INM. The full report is provided in Appendix D-10. The noise monitoring was completed on Labor Day weekend in September 1999, which is one of the busiest weekends at the airport. There were four locations where noise monitors were placed and recorded activity for a three-day period. The results of the noise monitoring are presented in Table 6-4.

Methodology
Integrated Noise Model Version 6.0. The FAA Integrated Noise Model Version 6.0 was used to generate contours for the years 2005 and 2015 using forecasts of aircraft operations. Analyses of area within the day/night equivalent sound level (DNL) 60, 65, 70, and 75 were performed for the future years.

Runway Utilization. Runway usage is not expected to change in the future. Thus, runway usage for the 2005 and 2015 scenarios remained the same as runway usage for the base year. Runway usage is presented in Table 6-8.

Flight Tracks. Flight tracks are not expected to change from the base year. The flight track distribution for the 2005 and 2015 scenarios remained the same as flight track distribution for the base year.

Daytime-Nighttime Operations. Based on discussions with airport management, there is no change in the day/night split of aircraft operations. Therefore, the day/night split used in the base case will remain the same for both 2005 and 2015 at 97 percent/3 percent respectively.

Noise Metrics
Using the operations information described in the previous sections, DNL contours were calculated for the year 2005 scenario, year 2015 Existing Runway scenario, and 2015 Runway Shift scenario. As was done for the base year contours, the contours for these two forecast years are displayed in 5 dB increments for DNL levels of 60, 65, 70, and 75 dB.

Mitigation

Based on the noise contour analysis, the airport appears to have no significant noise impact based upon the Federal definition (i.e. FAA, EPA, HUD) of noise impacts. However, the airport does experience problems with aircraft overflights with traffic arriving and departing the airport from many directions rather than funneled through specific corridors. The airport also experiences late night operations that have created noise complaints as well. While few in number, the perceived levels of this noise are exaggerated because of low ambient noise levels and typical nighttime activities.

MVY management has taken a number of proactive steps to address the noise issues that face the airport through contact with aircraft operators that have generated noise complaints. By developing a Noise Abatement Program, MVY management will have a formal set of rules that, through education of the pilot community, can have a positive effect to minimize noise issues at MVY.

The following steps have been used as a guide to implement a Noise Abatement Program for MVY:

1. Finalize the Noise Abatement Procedures with flight tracks after obtaining FAA concurrence.
2. Develop a formal Noise Abatement Program document that includes procedures, tracks and other information relating to the program.
3. Review the Noise Abatement Program with FAA, tenants, pilots and community representatives on a regular basis.
4. Publish and disseminate the Noise Abatement Program among local airport tenants and transient pilots.
5. Place Noise Abatement Program material on the airport web site.
6. Complete a monthly survey with ATCT personnel and pilots on how the abatement procedures are working and modify as needed.
7. Work with towns to incorporate land use measures and restrictions to avoid future non-compatible development.

 

 

Please feel free to contact us with any questions regarding the procudres, or if you have suggestions which may be helpful for future revisions of the documents.